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Wednesday, April 23, 2014

SAKE IN THE CITY II: Wine and Wagyu Beef Tasting

reporter: Miguel Dominguez



On October 28, 2013 at the event space '404', JETRO, the Japan External Trade Organization of New York, presented "Sake and the City II" — Discover Japanese Wagyu.

JETRO, a Japanese government organization that promotes mutual trade and investment between Japan and the rest of the world, brought experts in the Wagyu beef industry and also sake distributors to present seminars and tastings.

In one of the seminars, Yosuke Yamaguchi of ZEN-NOH described Japanese Wagyu. A specialist in horticulture and livestock general planning, Yamaguchi establishes relationships with restaurants, retailers, promoting sales of ZEN-NOH meats to the US, .

Distributors poured a variety of sake, some of which are not available in New York. Several of the choices complement Wagyu.


To help guests decide how best to pair sake with wagyu, Sake expert Timothy Sullivan and Chef Abe Hiroki teamed up for a seminar. Sullivan is a tireless champion of sake, teaching, consulting, and writing about all things related to promoting sake outside of Japan.

Sake teacher, consultant and writer Timothy Sullivan, who was awarded the title 'Sake Samurai'
by the Japan Sake Brewers Association in recognition of his efforts in promoting sake outside of Japan































































One of the excellent examples of Japanese foods is “Wagyu” Japanese beef. The high prime beef is so tender that it almost melts in your mouth. Raised and processed under strict government control, “Wagyu” Japanese beef will add color to your healthy and enjoyable dietary lifestyle.






Wagyu refers to specific breeds and its cross breeds of beef cattle originated from Japan. These breeds have been selectively bred for a hundred year by Japanese beef cattle producers and breeding agencies. Japanese cattle producers are very proud of Wagyu as their prized cattle.

Now, Japanese Wagyu beef is incomparable in its quality and taste to any other beef in the world.










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